Exercise 1.3 : Review & Observations

In the photographs of the jetty used in 1.3 (1) , (below) there is a clear line for the viewer to follow which naturally leads them out of the frame. The choice of the jetty was an attempt (of sorts) to provide a metaphor. In the same way as the jetty directs the viewers eye along its structure, so too does the jetty itself mirror the journey from land out to sea.

The use of the lines informed by the architecture of the forts in 1.3 (2) below seeks to give the sense that the picture is only part of a much bigger whole.  Although I clearly had choice over what was contained within each of the photographs , the jetty images were dependent upon me ensuring that the entire seaward end of the structure remained in view. With the brickwork I was able to select aspects of the wall which could form a complete image in their own right, without needing to show the entirety of the fort.

Cropping vs framing:

Framing is the act of using the parameters of the lens as an indicator of what will appear in the final image. Naturally there are still creative choices to be made by the photographer as they compose the image.

Cropping is the act of removing elements of the photograph which detract from the overall image, in order to strengthen the final image. (The creative choice still rests with the photographer, as final arbiter of the editing process).

Kite. Ijmuiden aan Zee , NL. John Callaway [2016]

Kite. Ijmuiden aan Zee , NL. John Callaway [2016]

Beached... John Callaway [2016]

Beached… John Callaway [2016]

As an illustration, the two images above are cropped versions of the original photographs (below) taken in response to the brief for 1.3(1). I think that the image of the beach huts is much stronger in the cropped version, although I think the kite flyer on the beach image works equally as well both cropped and un-cropped because of the  windblown sand in the foreground.

 

 

 

Advertisements

Exercise 1.3 (2) Line

“Take a number of shots using lines to flatten the pictorial space. To avoid the effects of perspective, the sensor/film plane should be parallel to the subject and you may like to try a high viewpoint (i.e. looking down). Modern architecture offers strong lines and dynamic diagonals, and zooming in can help to create simpler, more abstract compositions.”

Early evening walk around a couple of the Palmerston Forts built during the Victorian period on the recommendations of the 1860 Royal Commission on the Defence of the United Kingdom.

The works were also known as Palmerston’s Follies, partly because the first ones, around Portsmouth, had their main armament facing inland to protect Portsmouth from a land-based attack, which gave the impression that they faced the wrong way to defend from a French attack. Also because they were considered of questionable military value. The images above are from the inward facing walls of Forts Widley and Fort Purbrook.

I like the  abstract quality of the brickwork and slowly decaying windows and iron work and thought it would be a good source of a flattened image because of the large expanse of brickwork.

Wasn’t expecting the dog, but quite liked its juxtaposition with the CCTV camera!

Exercise 1.3 (1) Line

“Take a number of shots using lines to create a sense of depth. Shooting with a wide- angle lens (zooming out) strengthens a diagonal line by giving it more length within the frame. The effect is dramatically accentuated if you choose a viewpoint close to the line”.

Langstone Harbour. John Callaway [2016]

Langstone Harbour. John Callaway [2016]

Living by the sea, I wanted to try and use the projection of a jetty as a means of creating a sense of depth. There is a large expanse of blue sea and sky in each photograph. The aim was therefore to use the jetty as both the focal point and the sign post into the distance.

I think that both photographs do this quite well, although the second image (below) is a far stronger image, as there are less distractions. I think that the shingle and metal objects in the foreground of the image above still make an interesting photograph, but at the expense of drawing the viewer fully into the picture.

Jetty. John Callaway [2016]

Jetty. John Callaway [2016]